Veterina

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Two large, dark-blue-staining Anaplasma platys morulae in a circulating platelet from an infected dog. The normal, smaller, pink-staining platelet granules are also observed in the cytoplasm of the infected platelet

Canine anaplasmosis is caused by one of two gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacterial agents, Anaplasma phagocytophilum or Anaplasma platys.

An intracytoplasmic Anaplasma phagocytophilum morula in a neutrophil in the synovial fluid of an infected dog

Canine anaplasmosis is caused by one of two gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacterial agents, Anaplasma phagocytophilum or Anaplasma platys.

An intracytoplasmic Anaplasma phagocytophilum morula in a toxic band neutrophil in the peripheral blood

Canine anaplasmosis is caused by one of two gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacterial agents, Anaplasma phagocytophilum or Anaplasma platys. Both types are likely spread by ticks and can occur worldwide.

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