Homo heidelbergensis

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Homo heidelbergensis is an extinct species of Homo that lived in Africa, Europe and western Asia between 600,000 and 200,000 years ago. Sometimes regarded as another name for Homo rhodesiensis. Temporal range: 0.7–0.2 Ma

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aka (?) Homo rhodesiensis
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aka (?) Homo rhodesiensis

Known as Broken Hill1, the Rhodesian Man is an almost complete cranium discovered on June 17th, 1921

Meet the Rhodesian Man

Widely known as Broken Hill 1 (also Kabwe 1), the Rhodesian Man is an almost complete cranium discovered on June 17th, 1921 in a lead and zinc mine, 18 meters below the ground level, at Broken Hill…

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Homo heidelbergensis by Mauricio Antón

'Homo Heidelbergensis Skull And Face' Photographic Print - Mauricio Anton | Art.com

Homo Heidelbergensis Skull And Face Photographic Print by Mauricio Anton. Find art you love and shop high-quality art prints, photographs, framed artworks and posters at Art.com. 100% satisfaction guaranteed.

Homo Heidelbergensis

Homo Heidelbergensis, for Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins, by Karen Carr and Karen Carr Studio, Inc.

Homo Heidelbergensis, for Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins, by Karen Carr and Karen Carr Studio, Inc.

Homo heidelbergensis gathering food by Juan Navarro

Pleistoceno en Murcia | Juan Navarro

Homo heidelbergensis, cast of arago 21 and Arago, a skull and lower jaw discovered in Arago Caves, Tautavel, France

Homo heidelbergensis

Proconsul africanus is the first species of the oligocene-era fossil genus of primate to be discovered and was named by Arthur Hopwood, an associate of Louis Leakey, in 1933. The Leakey expedition of 1947 - 1948 to Rusinga Island in Lake Victoria uncovered more species of Proconsul. Louis Leakey made an especially complete find of Proconsul there in 1948, which was for a number of decades labeled africanus, but was reclassified as heseloni in 1993 by Alan Walker. The 18-million-year-old…

Homo heidelbergensis Kabwe 1 (cranium)  Broken Hill, Zambia About 400 000 BP Discovered by T. Zwigelaar, 1921  Photo: Don Hitchcock 2013 Source and text: Western Australian Museum

Homo heidelbergensis

Proconsul africanus is the first species of the oligocene-era fossil genus of primate to be discovered and was named by Arthur Hopwood, an associate of Louis Leakey, in 1933. The Leakey expedition of 1947 - 1948 to Rusinga Island in Lake Victoria uncovered more species of Proconsul. Louis Leakey made an especially complete find of Proconsul there in 1948, which was for a number of decades labeled africanus, but was reclassified as heseloni in 1993 by Alan Walker. The 18-million-year-old…

Homo heidelbergensis, Kabwe, Zambia, 1921. Discovered by Tom Zwiglaar, Between 300,000 and 125,000 years old. Shows features similar to H. erectus such as a low braincase profile, large brow ridges, a slight widening of the midface known as the sagittal keel, and a protrusion at the back of the skull named the occipital torus,  also resembles modern humans with a flatter, less prognathic face, and larger brain

Kabwe 1

Searching for metal ore deposits in the limestone caves of Kabwe, Zambia, Swiss miner Tom Zwiglaar is credited with finding the first early human

Art of Petry: Homo heidelbergensis (femele)

Homo heidelbergensis (femele)

Homo heidelbergensis — sometimes called Homo rhodesiensis — is an extinct species of the genus Homo which lived in Africa, Europe and western Asia from at least 600,000 years ago, and may date back 1,300,000 years. It survived until about 200,000 to 250,000 years ago. Its brain was nearly as large as that of a modern Homo sapiens. It is very likely the direct ancestor of Homo sapiens (in Africa) and the Neanderthals (in Europe), and perhaps also the Denisovans (in Central Asia). First…

Known as Broken Hill1, the Rhodesian Man is an almost complete cranium discovered on June 17th, 1921

Meet the Rhodesian Man

Widely known as Broken Hill 1 (also Kabwe 1), the Rhodesian Man is an almost complete cranium discovered on June 17th, 1921 in a lead and zinc mine, 18 meters below the ground level, at Broken Hill…

Homo Heidelbergensis Poster featuring the photograph Homo Heidelbergensis Skull, Broken Hill by Science Photo Library

Homo heidelbergensis skull, Broken Hill Poster by Science Photo Library

Homo heidelbergensis skull, Broken Hill poster by Science Photo Library. Our posters are produced on acid-free papers using archival inks to guarantee that they last a lifetime without fading or loss of color. All posters include a 1" white border around the image to allow for future framing and matting, if desired.

At the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.  For background on this piece, see the scientific tourist #160.

Homo heidelbergensis

At the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. For background on this piece, see the scientific tourist #160.

Homo heidelbergensis es una especie extinta del género Homo, que surgió hace más de 600 000 años y perduró al menos hasta hace 200 000 años.Eran individuos altos que tenían 1,80 m de estatura y muy fuertes (llegarían a 105 kg), de grandes cráneos que median 1350 cm³, muy aplanados con relación a los del hombre actual, con mandíbulas salientes y gran abertura nasal. Se trata de la primera especie humana en la que es posible detectar indicios de una mentalidad simbólica.

Recreation of a group of Homo heidelbergensis, based on the remains found in the Sima of the Bones.

Atapuerca: notas acerca de la evolución humana

Introducción Los yacimientos de Atapuerca, situados en la provincia de Burgos, salieron a la luz cuando, a finales del s. XIX, se le encargó a una compañía inglesa la construcción de una línea de f…

Homo heidelbergensis: Se trata de individuos muy altos (1,80 m) y fuertes (llegarían a 100 kg), de grandes cráneos (casi 1.400 cm3) todavía muy aplanados, con mandíbulas salientes y gran abertura nasal. Especie intermedia entre el Homo antecessor y el hombre de Neandertal. Datan entre 500.000 y 250.000 años.

Homo Heidelbergensis

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HOMO_HEIDELBERGENSIS

HOMO_HEIDELBERGENSIS