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Native Plants

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Native Plants. Get inspired and try out new things.

Amsonia ciliata var filifolia Georgia Pancake

Amsonia 'Georgia Pancake' is a rare blue star, discovered by native plant guru Bob McCartney in a sandhills habitat in central Georgia's Wheeler County. This unusual ecotype, which will possibly be named as a new species, has soft, green, needle-like foliage clothing the prostrate stems. We grow Amsonia ciliata 'Georgia Pancake' in the rock garden, where it makes a dazzling mat of bright green foliage to 2' wide. The foliage turns golden in fall before going to sleep but returns in spring with clusters of pale blue flowers at the tip of each branch. As a soft-foliage contrast around bold textured plants, it is unmatched...as is its deer resistance.

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Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)

If you’re looking for an outdoor native flower for your garden, the Purple Coneflower is a perennial favorite! They are found natively from Texas to the whole eastern coast of the US. This is a drought-tolerant plant that is also deer resistant, but thrives in Full to Partial Sun and Medium soil moisture. The Purple Coneflower is a host plant to the Ottoe Skipper butterfly and is a favorite of various types of bees. You will be purchasing 3, 3" plastic pots containing 3 well-rooted Purple Coneflower plants grown from seed with love in Minnesota. Sun Requirements: Full to Partial Sun (4-6 hours+) Water Requirements: Medium to Medium-Dry Soil Bloom Time: July-September Plant Spacing: 1 Foot Plant Estimated Height at Maturity: 4 Feet USDA Planting Zones: 4-8

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Rudbeckia auriculata

Here's a fabulous and rare US native plant that you're not likely to run into at your neighborhood garden center. The giant, bold-textured Rudbeckia auriculata is endemic to a small region in southeastern Alabama and adjacent Florida and Georgia. Our plants are cutting grown from a population in Webster County, Georgia. Rudbeckia auriculata grows alongside pitcher plants in moist, sunny sites, but can also be found in alkaline seeps. In the garden, Rudbeckia auriculata grows fine for us in typical garden soils where it produces 8' tall, joe pye weed-like stalks that branch toward the top. The branches are then topped with clusters of 2-3" golden orange flowers in August and September. In rich soils, Rudbeckia auriculata can lean like the Tower of Pisa, so it's best used at the back of the border where it can find support as needed. A percentage from each plant sold goes to the Atlanta Botanic Garden for habitat preservation.

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Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest

The Pacific Northwest abounds with native plants that bring beauty to the home garden while offering food and shelter to birds, bees, butterflies, and other wildlife. Elegant trilliums thrive in woodland settings. Showy lewisias stand out in the rock garden. Hazel and huckleberry number among the delights of early spring, while serviceberry and creek dogwood provide a riot of fall color. Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest is the essential resource for learning how to best use this stunning array.Close to 1,000 choices of trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals, and grasses for diverse terrain and conditions, from Canada to California, and east to the Rockies948 color photographs, with useful habitat iconsFully updated nomenclature, with an index of subjects and an index of plant names (common and scientific)New to this edition: chapters on garden ecology and garden scienceAppendix of Pacific Northwest botanical gardens and native plant societiesGlossary of botanical, horticultural, and gardening termsWith enthusiasm, easy wit, and expert knowledge, renowned botanist Art Kruckeberg and horticulturist Linda Chalker-Scott show Northwest gardeners, from novice to expert, how to imagine and realize their perfect sustainable landscape.Author: Arthur R. Kruckeberg, Linda Chalker-ScottPublisher: University of Washington PressPublished: 03/12/2019Pages: 392Binding Type: PaperbackWeight: 2.70lbsSize: 10.00h x 7.50w x 1.00dISBN: 9780295744155About the AuthorArthur R. Kruckeberg (1920-2016) was professor of botany at the University of Washington for nearly four decades. He cofounded the Washington Native Plant Society and authored The Natural History of Puget Sound Country and Geology and Plant Life, as well as prior editions of Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Linda Chalker-Scott is associate professor of horticulture and extension specialist at Washington State University. She cohosts the Garden Professors blog, and her books include The Informed Gardener, The Informed Gardener Blooms Again, and How Plants Work. Richard G. Olmstead is professor of botany at the University of Washington and curator at the University of Washington Herbarium, Burke Museum.This title is only available via back order

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Cheilanthes lanosa Montgomery

(aka: Myriopteris lanosa) Cheilanthes lanosa is a great smaller native East and Midwest US dryland fern for the rock garden or, for that matter, any garden. Eventually reaching 8" in height with a spread of 15", this extremely drought-tolerant hairy lip fern is composed of durable, olive-green, deer-resistant evergreen fronds. Cheilanthes lanosa grows equally as well in a sunny spot or in part shade...good in acid or alkaline soils. This offering represents our spore-grown plants from a Paul James accession from the Montgomery County, Virginia shale barrens.

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Deer-Resistant Native Plants for the Northeast - Paperback

"For Northeastern gardeners—all of whom battle the serious problem that is deer browsing—this is definitely one for the library.” —GardenRant The benefits of native plants are plentiful—less upkeep, more pollinators, and a better environment. In Deer-Resistant Native Plants for the Northeast, Ruth Rogers Clausen and Gregory D. Tepper provide a list of native plants that have one more benefit—they are proven to help prevent your garden from becoming a deer buffet. From annuals and perennials to grasses and shrubs, every suggested plant includes a deer-resistance rating, growing advice, companion species, and the beneficial wildlife the plant does attract. Let these beautiful natives help your landscape flourish! For gardeners in Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, DC. Product DetailsISBN-13: 9781604699869 Publisher: Timber Press Incorporated Publication Date: 02-16-2021 Pages: 220 Product Dimensions: 6.90(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)About the Author Ruth Rogers Clausen is the author of 50 Beautiful Deer-Resistant Plants, and co-author of Essential Perennials and The Proven Winners Garden Book. She received a Quill and Trowel award from the Garden Writers Association (now Garden Communicators International) and has written for the American Garden Guides series. She is the former horticulture editor for Country Living Garden magazine and a long-time contributor to Country Gardens magazine. Ruth lectures widely at horticultural conventions and symposia, flower shows, and to garden societies and clubs. In 2017, she was awarded the Garden Media Award by the Perennial Plant Association. Gregory D. Tepper is a professional horticulturist, lecturer, consultant, and life-long native plant enthusiast. He is currently horticulturist at the Arboretum at Laurel Hill and West Laurel Hill Cemeteries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and previously held the positions of director of horticulture at Mt. Cuba Center in Hockessin, Delaware, and director of horticulture and board member at Delaware Botanic Gardens, where he was instrumental in developing the garden’s initial horticultural mission and implementing a two-acre meadow designed by world-renowned garden designer Piet Oudolf.

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Native American Ethnobotany - Hardcover

An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than 4000 plants. More than 44,000 uses for these plants by various tribes are documented here. This is undoubtedly the most massive ethnobotanical survey ever undertaken, preserving an enormous store of information for the future. Product DetailsISBN-13: 9780881924534 Publisher: Timber Press Incorporated Publication Date: 08-15-1998 Pages: 927 Product Dimensions: 9.00(w) x 11.31(h) x 2.13(d)About the Author Daniel E. Moerman teaches anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. He is widely known as a leading expert in the field of ethnobotany. Dr. Moerman received the Annual Literature Award from the Council on Botanical and Horticultural Libraries and the Distinguished Economic Botanist Award from the Society for Economic Botany.Read an Excerpt Native American peoples had a remarkable amount of knowledge of the world in which they lived. In particular, they knew a great deal about plants. There are in North America 31,566 kinds (species, subspecies, varieties, and so on) of vascular plants: seed plants, including the flowering plants (angiosperms) and conifers (gymnosperms), and spore-bearing plants, including the ferns, club mosses, spike mosses, and horsetails (pteridophytes). North America is defined here as North America north of Mexico, and Hawaii and Greenland. American Indians used 2874 of these species as medicines, 1886 as foods, 230 as dyes, and 492 as fibers (for weaving, baskets, building materials, and so on). They used 1190 species for a broad range of other purposes as well, classified in this book as Other. All told, they found useful purpose for 3923 kinds of vascular plants. Native American Ethnobotany also contains information on 106 kinds of nonvascular plants (algae, fungi, lichens, liverworts, and mosses). The data for nonvascular plants are much less complete than those for vascular plants, however.Native American Ethnobotany includes information on plant use by Native American people. Most of the plants used are native to North America, but some are not. Some are plants that were introduced into North America — some perhaps in pre-Columbian times and some certainly thereafter — and that became naturalized, growing spontaneously. Other plants are introductions that were kept in cultivation. The information in Native American Ethnobotany documents plant usage no doubt dating back to very early times and passed down through generations as traditional knowledge, as well as innovations in response to much more recent plant introductions ... From Conclusions on Usages There is an enormous amount of real human knowledge contained in Native American Ethnobotany. The earliest evidence we have of human beings using plants for medicine comes from the Middle Paleolithic site of Shanidar in northern Iraq, dated about 60,000 years ago. People have been experimenting with nature since then (and perhaps before), learning what could be eaten, what would stop bleeding or relieve pain, what would make good baskets or colors. People first came to the Americas about 15,000 years ago and have been studying the plants of the two continents ever since. Given that the floras of North America and China are remarkably alike, it is possible that the earliest Asian immigrants to North America saw recognizable plants when they got here. Much of this accumulated knowledge of useful plants, slowly wrung from nature over millennia, has in a few centuries been lost, at least lost as a part of normal human life. There are specialists — anthropologists, ethnobotanists, phytochemists, pharmacognosists — who are aware of some portions of what this book contains. But in past times this was to a large degree the knowledge of ordinary people. Surely there were specialists, people who were more interested than others in these matters, and they may even have developed esoteric knowledge that they kept to themselves for personal profit. But generally this was normal human knowledge, part and parcel of everyday life. People walked in the world and saw plants they knew to be useful for various purposes. Their children learned of these matters as naturally as our children learn the names of baseball teams or athletic shoes or rock bands. In a world where one may buy a bottle of aspirin tablets at a grocery store for little more than the price of the bottle there is not much need for people to be able to recognize willow, black birch, spiraea, or wintergreen as naturally occurring painkillers. And I do not believe there is a need for anyone to give up on aspirin tablets and rely on willow twigs. One need not eat medicinal plants in order to appreciate them, any more than a bird-watcher needs to eat a curlew to enjoy it. But when one knows something of the uses people have made of thousands of the wild plants around us, the plants take on a new meaning, a new value greater than their beauty or their cooling shade or their pleasant scent. From "Native Americans" The names of Native American or American Indian groups is a complicated matter. Even the phrase American Indian is problematic. Christopher Columbus and his followers were naive about the location of "India." And so, many people now seem to prefer the term Native American. But it is also the case that indigenous peoples were here long before the continents of the New World were named after the Italian navigator, Amerigo Vespucci. In Canada, the generic term usually used is Native People. Yet the fact remains that many people have been quite happy with the term Indian. One of the radical movements of the 1960s, for example, was known as AIM, the American Indian Movement. Since these names often have political significance it is for all practical purposes impossible to refer generically to the indigenous population of the Americas without offending someone, but such is not the intention here. There are similar problems with tribal names. A classic case is the name Eskimo. The word is, apparently, an English mispronunciation of a French mispronunciation of a Montagnais or Micmac wordayashkimew, which seems to have meant something like "eaters of raw meat," intended as a nasty insult. The Eskimo people generally call themselves Inuit or Innuit, meaning "people." I am unaware of the Inuit name for the Micmac but my guess is that it was equally insulting. Such derived names are not always insults, however. The name Navaho or Navajo is a Spanish variation on a Tewa word meaning "large arroyo with cultivated fields," a place name. The Navajo name for themselves is Dene, meaning "people," but many Navajo also call themselves Navajo. Again, the names used to refer to particular Native American tribes can occasion political debate. Referring to one group by a term that means "people" implicitly asserts that other groups are something other than people, for example. Names used inNative American Ethnobotany are not intended in any way to offend anyone. I have elected to use the names for peoples reported in the original sources. This means that material for "the same people" is sometimes listed under different designations, but rarely is it for the same people at the same time. There are 291 groups mentioned in Native American Ethnobotany, ... From "Organization of the Information in Native American Ethnobotany" Ethnobotanical Information Under each plant name, usages are categorized first by the five main categories — Drug, Food, Fiber, Dye, Other — in that order. Each of the five main categories is next divided alphabetically by tribe, all the names of which are listed in the previous chapter under Native Americans. Following the tribe name are all the uses of the plant, listed alphabetically according to the categories defined in the previous chapter under Plant Usage Categories ... The statement or statements on usage are followed by an abbreviated reference, for example, (184:197) ... The number preceding the colon refers to the source from which the information came, and sources are enumerated in the Bibliography. The number following the colon is the page number in that original source. When the original source used a plant name differing from that adopted in the Catalog of Plants, that is, the source cited a synonymous name, the plant name used in the source is also given within the parentheses, for example, within the entry for Acer negundo var. interius, (as Negundo interius 138:38) ... Two comprehensive Plant Usage Indexes are provided so that the information collected in the Catalog of Plants can be found in ways other than by plant name: Index of Tribes. Categories of plant usage are arranged by names of Native American groups, as listed in the previous chapter under Native Americans. Categories of plant usage are listed first under one of the five main categories — Drug, Food, Fiber, Dye, Other — and then alphabetically under the particular usage ... Index of Usages. Plant genera are arranged alphabetically under the categories of plant usage, first under one of the five main categories — Drug, Food, Fiber, Dye, Other — and then alphabetically under the particular usage, as defined in the previous chapter under Plant Usage Categories ...

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Mount Airy Fothergilla, Multi Season Plant, Honey Like Fragrance, Dwarf Variety - 1 Gallon

MOUNT AIRY FOTHERGILLA- Native shrubMulti Season Plant, Honey Like Fragrance- White BloomsSHOWY FRAGRANT BLOOMS in April/May Great Fall ColorHardy in zones 4-9, Mature size is 4-5 ft tall Compact ShapeSun/partial shade, Disease and Pest Tolerant Note: The plant is shipped in its pot, firmly secured with several layers of clear tape, thereby avoiding any shuffling and moving during transit. The plant reaches you with minimal damage- very safe and secure. We have been shipping plants like this for several years (plant are sometimes shipped in smaller pots for safety and ease of shipping). Most plants go dormant in fall and winter and will lose most of their leaves - looking dead and dry - very normal. They will flush out in spring.We cannot send ship some plants and some sizes to California due to restrictions placed by department of agriculture.

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Polystichum acrostichoides

Polystichum acrostichoides is a wonderful, easy-to-grow, deer-resistant US native (Minnesota south to Florida) with sturdy, dark, evergreen fronds emanating from a central point, making a 2' wide clump...particularly effective when used in drifts. The fronds first emerge upright, then flatten with age. Christmas fern (known in PC circles as the Seasonal Holiday Fern) is one of the finest of all evergreen ferns and retains its attractive appearance all winter...simply superb for woodland gardens, especially those with deep shade areas!

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Thelypteris kunthii

(syn: Thelypteris normalis) The robust Thelypteris kunthii is one of our favorite Southeast US native ferns and certainly one of the most durable ferns we grow. The large, light green triangular fronds of abundant maiden fern are produced all summer, and contrast nicely with the near white stipes (stems) that support them. The slowly rhizomatous, deer-resistant, winter-deciduous Thelypteris kunthii spreads nicely to make incredible woodland masses. Not only does abundant maiden fern thrive in shade, but it grows equally well for us in full, baking sun. We think everyone should have an abundance of maidens throughout their garden.

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